First Substantial Tomato Harvest of the Summer!

We’ve been picking and eating Sun Gold cherry tomatoes and Yellow Pear tomatoes on a daily basis for a couple of weeks now, but yesterday was the first time some of the other tomatoes were ripe and ready for picking…and all I can say is WOO HOO!!!

Those are two Early Bush ‘Goliath” tomatoes in the front.  The three large tomatoes in the back are Mortgage Lifters.  The small tomatoes in the middle are Sun Gold cherries, Yellow Pears, and Principe Borghese. 

 

These lovelies are San Marzano plum tomatoes – the same tomatoes that just a week or so ago were suffering from Blossom End Rot.  This time around not a single tomato (on any plant) had blossom end rot – hooray!

The slicing tomatoes were slightly split or cracked, which I understand is also a side effect of inconsistent watering (gee – I sound like a bad mother or something!  I swear, I water regularly!), but  they should still be just fine to eat, and I cannot wait to dig into them the minute I get home from work today!

Here’s the whole batch:

A little salt, olive oil, and vinegar on some of these sliced up…I’d just about call that a meal!

I was a little concerned at the beginning of the summer that I’d gone overboard and planted too many tomatoes for two people to keep up with, but I think we’ll manage just fine.   If we start getting inundated over the month of August, I certainly won’t complain!  It will just give me an excuse to start canning!

Here’s the list of the tomatoes we’re growing (one plant of each type, all in containers):

‘Sun Gold’

‘Yellow Pear’

‘Principe Borghese’

‘San Marzano’

‘Mortgage Lifter’

Early Bush ‘Goliath’

Brandywine

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10 thoughts on “First Substantial Tomato Harvest of the Summer!

  1. Great looking tomatoes. I think many people’s tomatoes are struggling with inconsistent watering this year. Its been so hot and, at least, we have not had enough rain. Regardless, a cracked tomato tastes as good! Great job. I look forward to reading more.

  2. Yummy photos.
    I am intrigued by the San Marzano’s, having never grown those.

    When a lot of rain is in the forecast, I will pick the largest reddest fruits ahead of time. Leaving them on the vine often results in split skins – too much water at once too close to harvest time. If I don’t notice the splits, they get moldy fast and also attract gnats.

    We have had only two spits of rain today while counties on both sides of us are getting good soakings. I actually picked several big tomatoes last night, foolishly believing the forecast that I’d awaken to thunderstorms.

    Did you lose any fruits to bird-pecks? For the Yugoslavians and St. PIerres, I have resorted to wrapping fruit clusters in tulle netting to stop catbirds from ruining them.

    I hope you have a good, sharp knife in the drawer to slice up your bountiful harvest. They look totally scrumptious sitting on that blue plate!

  3. Wow, Aimee, they look amazing! The only thing we have ripe are the Sungolds. I’m eyeing the Brandywines, I hope they turn color soon. Will you be collecting any seeds from Mortgage Lifter, I’ve never grown those before. They look awesome!!

  4. Wow Aimee! Looks like good mothering to ME. What a harvest already, and more to come. There is nothing like the color, or the taste, of a vine ripened tomato. Happy Dinner!

  5. Hi neighbor, your tomatoes look great! I’m growing heirlooms for the first time this year, and have been coordinating with other Gotham gardeners doing the same. As Mimi mentioned above, we’re planning the Great Brooklyn Seed, Etc., Exchange in September — tentatively planned for the 17th in Kensington. Let me know if you or anyone else you know might be interested: revelgardener@gmail.com. I’m also looking for people with experience with particular plants (e.g., self-watering containers, heirlooms, flowers, native plants, etc.) who might be willing to do a short address on the subjects. Please spread the word. Congrats on the great looking tomatoes!!! Enjoy & revel on!

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